Affinity


Affinity
1) *Canon law was strict in forbidding marriage between couples too closely related by marriage or by being a godparent. Such marriages could be rendered null by the Church. Thus, though a later instance, Henry VIII's marriage to Catherine of Aragon was deemed null because she had allegedly been married to Henry's brother, Arthur. When, in the 11c and 12c, the Latin affinitas was used it was this sense that was intended, not the second political sense found in the following entry. [< Lat. affinitas = relationship] -
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2) Affinity is used today to describe the network of relations within a magnate's own country. This comprised knights and esquires who supported him in local affairs. During Edward III's reign, and the emergence of *bastard feudalism, magnates began to take on permanent retainers; they were also extending their power and were able to influence local courts through which they intimidated those they wished to constrain. While the *justice-in-eyre system might bring central authority to justice, local politics remained comfortably within the magnate's hands.

Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases. .

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  • Affinity — Affinity, in etymology affinity is the opposite of infinity . These two words have the same root coming from the Latin: finis = end . “Affinity” meaning is near to the “finis” e.g. close to the “zero point” in a before assumed space. On the other …   Wikipedia

  • affinity — af·fin·i·ty /ə fi nə tē/ n pl ties: relationship by marriage compare consanguinity Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • Affinity — Af*fin i*ty, n.; pl. {Affinities}. [OF. afinit[ e], F. affinit[ e], L. affinites, fr. affinis. See {Affined}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Relationship by marriage (as between a husband and his wife s blood relations, or between a wife and her husband s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • affinity — When affinity implies a mutual relationship or attraction, it is normally followed by between or with (The affinity between Britain and most of her former colonies • Beckett…stresses that he wrote the little book on order, not out of any deep… …   Modern English usage

  • affinity — [n1] liking or inclination toward something affection, attraction, closeness, compatibility, cotton*, cup of tea*, druthers*, fondness, good vibrations*, leaning, partiality, rapport, same wavelength, simpatico, sympathy, thing*, weakness*;… …   New thesaurus

  • affinity — (n.) c.1300, relation by marriage (as opposed to consanguinity), from O.Fr. afinité (12c.), from L. affinitatem (nom. affinitas) neighborhood, relationship by marriage, noun of state from affinis adjacent, also kin by marriage, lit. bordering on …   Etymology dictionary

  • affinity — 1 *attraction, sympathy Contrasted words: repugnance, repellency or repulsion, abhorrence (see corresponding adjectives at REPUGNANT): *antipathy, aversion 2 resemblance, *likeness, similarity, similitude, analogy Analogous words: agreement …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • affinity — ► NOUN (pl. affinities) 1) a natural liking or sympathy for someone or something. 2) a close relationship based on a common origin or structure. 3) relationship by marriage. 4) the tendency of a substance to combine with another. ORIGIN Latin… …   English terms dictionary

  • affinity — [ə fin′i tē, afin′i tē] n. pl. affinities [ME affinite < OFr afinite < L affinitas < affinis, adjacent, related by marriage < ad , to + finis, a border] 1. relationship by marriage: distinguished from CONSANGUINITY 2. close… …   English World dictionary

  • affinity — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ close, great, real, special, strong ▪ I felt a great affinity with the people of the islands. ▪ natural ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • Affinity —    In fifteenth century England, an affinity was a web of political and social connections constructed by a nobleman, either on the basis of royal favor and personal political standing or on the basis of family and territorial influence. A noble… …   Encyclopedia of the Wars of the Roses


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